Hemp Farmers in Mississippi Must Apply for USDA Program Rather than State Program

Mississippi Landscape
  • The state of Mississippi is directing hemp farmers to apply for a producer license through the USDA rather than the state.
  • Although Mississippi passed their Hemp Cultivation Act last month, they lacked the funding they needed from lawmakers to implement it.
  • Mississippi was one of the last three states to create a hemp production plan.

Mississippi, one of the last states to hold out on their hemp program, is now telling farmers that are interested in growing that they need to apply for an individual producer license through the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA).

Although the state passed the Mississippi Hemp Cultivation Act into law in June, lawmakers did not provide the funding that the state needed to implement their hemp cultivation program. As a result, the USDA’s oversight is the only option that Mississippi hemp farmers have in order to legally grow hemp this season.

The Mississippi Hemp Cultivation Act legalized hemp cultivation in the state and directed the Commissioner of Agriculture and Commerce to create the state’s plan.

Due to the USDA’s current remote working conditions, all Mississippi farmers are required to submit their hemp production applications to [email protected].

One of Three

Mississippi was one of the last three states that was lacking a hemp production program; however, they were not the first to waive their own state’s production plan for the year. In fact, New Hampshire was the first state to direct their farmers to grow under USDA jurisdiction. So far, five licenses have been issued in New Hampshire for the 2020 growing season.

South Dakota finished their hemp production plan back in March but is still awaiting approval for it from the USDA.

Idaho is the last state remaining in the country where it is illegal to produce hemp.

Wrap Up

The hemp industry may have its hiccups, but you can expect to see it grow overall as nearly every state in the country is joining in and creating their own production plans. After the 2020 growing season is fully concluded, you can expect the USDA to take a closer look at the number and adjust certain regulations and laws accordingly.

Jayden Pire

Jayden Pire | Author

Jayden Pire is a young, fun-loving and inspired writer who graduated from the University of Pittsburgh. A big advocate for the nationwide legalization of marijuana, Jayden's proud to provide his readers with the latest news and updates on CBD. His goal is to ensure that every reader leaves the site with a positive perspective on the CBD industry and has an open mind toward legalization efforts that will help provide a safer alternative to prescription pain killers. Aside from writing, Jayden enjoys spending time with his dog and binge-watching his favorite television show on repeat.

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